31713 S Ashland  Ave,  Beecher, Illinois 60401  

We are pleased to announce our 2019…

Padden Family Farm

FALL fill your freezer promotion

PACKAGES ARE AVAILABLE FOR PICKUP APPROXIMATELY OCTOBER 1, 2019

OPTIONS:

THE MINI = 30# of pork, beef and lamb packaged for smaller households, enough for 1 cubic foot of freezer space-- great if you only have refrigerator freezer space-- $249


THE SAMPLER  = 60# of pork, beef and lamb packaged for small family meals, needs about 2 cubic feet of freezer space-- $479

STOCKING UP = 120# of pork,  beef and lamb packaged for small family meals, needs about 4 cubic feet of freezer space-- $839

THIS LITTLE PIGGY=30# of pork favorites packaged for smaller households, needs about 1 cubic foot of freezer space-- $219

PICK OF THE PIG ( all pork) = 60# of everyone's favorite cuts of pork packaged for small family meals, needs about 2 cubic feet of freezer space--$419

 





 

farm report March 1, 2019

NEW AND EXCITING FOR 2019

Farmer Kelly is putting together a guide to healthy eating...

We will be posting chapters in the musing section of the website!  the following is a sneak preview!

Guide to Healthy Eating

How many diet links, nutrition articles and recipe books have you read? How many times have you started a regimen convinced this is “the one?” If you are like me, the numbers are large.  There are a lot of choices.  Some are just bath water, some have a little bit of baby. How do you determine what to keep?

I have to say that as I grow older and hopefully wiser, I find less and less new information that makes the keep list. So, I decided that maybe I should just organize my nutrition wisdom and get it down on paper.  Or at least into a file. This is that file: part Art, part Science, part common sense---hopefully useful and interesting---maybe even fun.

(Anything with an asterisk means *more details to be provided later)

The Basics  

  • Prepare and eat food mindfully

  • Know where your food comes from

  • Choose:  locally sourced, naturally raised, organically grown or fed*

  • Read labels

  • Avoid:  additives, preservatives, processed sugars, unhealthy fats*, artificial sweeteners, artificial colorings and flavorings

  • Strive for nutritionally balanced*

  • Learn your body’s triggers and sensitivities

  • Eliminate or appropriately prepare foods that are sources of inflammation, antinutrients and allergens

  • Include as much variety as possible

  • Consume caffeine and alcohol in moderation

  • Maintain a healthy gut environment with fermented foods rich in probiotics

  • Reduce your carbon footprint and your plastic use

  • Live by REDUCE, REUSE, RECYCLE

 

Strategies to accomplish the basics!

 

#1 Prepare and Eat Food Mindfully

This might seem sort of simplistic, but it is more difficult to achieve than you might think.  Modern humans live complicated lives.  We are culturally evolved to multi task, achieve success, get ahead, win the game…right?

Unfortunately, our bodies haven’t had time to evolve to adapt to our modern culture.  Biologically, we are still somewhere in the hunter-gatherer stage where a significant amount of our daily life revolved around our next meal.  Finding it, bringing it home, preparing it, and gratefully sharing it with those we loved.

We have lost most of that primal focus, and far too often, we eat without realizing we have eaten.  Or, to treat ourselves we plan elaborate social events, fixate on presentation and eat enough empty calories for the rest of the week.

Very few of us can ditch our modern lifestyle.  We still need to show up for that client presentation, taking the early train and skipping breakfast…WAIT!  Back up. Yes, client presentation…but SKIP BREAKFAST????

We have jobs, spouses, children, crises and responsibilities…but we also have health needs that are too easily pushed aside.  We need an app for that.  Or at least a few good hacks.  Good hacks coming up!

THE MOST IMPORTANT MEAL OF THE DAY HACK:

It doesn’t have to be breakfast, but one meal a day you should eat at a table with someone or ones you care about.  No phones, no screens no kidding.  Which meal that is depends on a lot of things.  I’m a farmer.  My husband owns a financial business but does daily farm chores for me in the morning.  For us it is usually breakfast.  Our kids are grown but when they were young, we often had both breakfast and dinner at a table. But that was in the stone age and I’m not sure it would be as likely today.

Whatever your life entails, try to eat one meal a day together.  It doesn’t always have to be the same one.  And it’s a process so don’t beat yourself up if you miss a day.  Try.

THE NEVER EAT WHILE IN MOTION OR DISTRACTED HACK:

Pretty self-explanatory.  No eating in the car.  No eating while you are physically doing something else—reading, writing, watching tv, talking on the phone, doing laundry—you get the picture. Healthy conversation at a table is allowed and encouraged.

PAY ME NOW OR PAY ME LATER HACKS:

Ahhhh….the joys of time management.

  • Carve out a few hours on your less busy days (nobody has real days off!) to do some advance food preparation.  It might be weeknight dinners, bag lunches, easy to grab snacks—whatever will make it easier for you to stay nutritionally aware when life gets whack a mole crazy.

  • Cook extra and freeze it for a rainy day (or a soccer tournament week)

  • Learn the joys of “mise en place.” It’s just French chef for prepping ingredients in advance. It works just as well for us as it does for them

 

#2 Know where your food comes from

Choose:  locally sourced, naturally raised, organically grown or fed.*  The more you know about how, where, and by whom your food is produced, the better! Get to know your grocer, your butcher and your farmer. 

#3 Read labels

  • Avoid:  additives, preservatives, processed sugars, unhealthy fats*, artificial sweeteners, artificial colorings and flavorings

#4 Strive for nutritionally balanced*

FOODS TO INCLUDE:

  • Pasture raised, organically fed meats, poultry, and eggs

  • Fish that is sustainably wild caught or responsibly farmed.  It depends on the species and the circumstances!!! Know where it comes from and what it eats.

  • Organically grown grains, legumes and nuts that have been prepared to reduce or eliminate anti-nutrients and inflammation causing properties*

  • Dairy—responsibly produced organic raw or fermented.

  • Organically grown fruits and vegetables--lots of variety

  • Healthy oils and fats:  including olive, avocado, coconut, lard, tallow and butter (clarified or fermented) from organic pastured animals

  • Herbs and spices

  • SUPERSTARS:  berries, dark leafy greens, garlic, onions, avocados, beets, sweet potatoes, chia seeds, flax seeds, quinoa

  • Lacto-fermented vegies like sauerkraut, kimchi, pickles.

WHERE TO FIND THEM…

GOOD:

  • check local grocery stores that carry a reasonable number of products that meet the requirements, but you must be disciplined. Danger lurks in those aisles!

  • Look online for products that can be bought with minimal shipping costs if you have room to store in quantity.

 

BETTER: 

  • Find a local producer, look for farmers markets, CSA programs and food co-ops

  • Form your own network of like-minded individuals to take advantage of group buying and mutual support

 

BEST:

  • Put in a garden

  • Raise a few chickens (pigs, cows, sheep, goats…)

  • Learn to prepare and preserve foods you might otherwise buy

  • Add a greenhouse

  • Add a root cellar

  • If you love it—plant it!

 

Try all of the above!